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Leland 2045: Planning for Generations

Leland 2045: Planning for Generations

On November 18, 2021, Leland Town Council adopted the Leland 2045 comprehensive land use plan, setting the policy direction for land use, development, and open space preservation as Leland grows, increases in population, and changes in demographics. Leland 2045 is a planning document that outlines goals, policies, and implementation strategies that were developed through a robust public engagement process. The purpose of Leland 2045 is to enable Leland officials and citizens to anticipate and constructively respond to growth and change, and to encourage the development of safe and healthy built and natural environments that create opportunities for all.

View the Leland 2045 Plan

This chapter provides an overview of the plan, how to use this document, a summary of previous plans, and the community process that informed this plan, as well as the vision statement, goals, and plan themes that shape the document. 

View the Leland 2045 Introduction

In this chapter, the Leland 2045 vision, opportunity, principles, and strategies have been organized into six themes derived from engagement with the community. 

View the Leland 2045 Plan Themes Chapter

The Action Playbook chapter covers implementation, priority investment, and organizes specific actions into a matrix action plan by theme establishing timing, level of investment, and assigning responsibility.

View the Leland 2045 Action Playbook

This chapter focuses on the key principles guiding urban and community frameworks, the Future Land Use Map (FLUM), and focal area studies. These frameworks will guide the Town on establishing policy direction and principles for planning the built environment with consideration for locating future parks, schools, community services, and street and trail improvements. 

View the Leland 2045 Community Frameworks

The Existing Conditions chapter captures a "snapshot" in time in the Town of Leland and the planning study area and takes a look at emerging issues and opportunities. This report is organized by the elements required by CAMA and reviews population growth, key demographics, housing stock, employment and job information, natural systems and environmental conditions, and information about current land use, community facilities, and the built environment. 

View the Leland 2045 Existing Conditions

Leland 2045 Future Land Use Map

Quarterly Updates

Between now and 2045, we are committed to providing quarterly updates on the progress made on this plan to show the initiatives taken towards building a better and brighter Leland.

Highly Valued and Protected Natural and Cultural Resources

  • Awarded $1,000 from the North Carolina Recreation and Park Association towards the Town’s first Lend a Hand in Leland event.
  • The NC Department of Environmental Quality is conducting a Brownfields Assessment for the future Sturgeon Creek Park.

Livable, Diverse, and Connected Neighborhoods that Accommodate Growth

  • The Town's application to join FEMA's Community Rating System program as a Class 7 community has been accepted.

A Resilient and Stable Economy

  • Emergency Management finalized a Debris Management Plan to assist with community recovery following a natural disaster. 
  • The Leland Tourism Development Authority awarded the Town $100,000 to go towards the construction of the amphitheater at Founders Park.
  • The Communications and Human Resources Departments produced three recruitment videos that emphasize the Town’s culture to attract prospective employees.
  • Staff presented the completed Feasibility Analysis and Economic Impact Study for the Jackeys Creek Development and proposed baseball stadium.

An Inclusive, Supported, Healthy, Safe, and Educated Community

  • Awarded $2,500 from the Walmart Community Grant Program to purchase medical bags for Police vehicles.
  • Awarded $3,300 from the Patrick Leahy Bulletproof Vest Partnership Program.
  • The Police Department hosted National Night Out on Oct. 3 to interact with the community and promote neighborhood camaraderie.
  • The Police Department hosted National Coffee with a Cop on Oct. 6 to meet and engage with the community.
  • Leland Fire/Rescue conducted fire safety educational programs at area schools in October.
  • Adopted regulations permitting wireless facilities towers in PUD districts which will expand and improve internet broadband services.

Infrastructure that Supports Community Life

An Active Participant in a Cooperative Region

  • Planning and Economic and Community Development staff participated in an after work social with members of AARP and community group We Live Here Leland to discuss Town initiatives and hear citizen concerns.
  • On Sept. 15, the Planning Department hosted the Town's first Parking Day, a global participatory event promoting safe and equitable access to public spaces and streets.
  • Partnered with the WMPO, Town of Navassa, and the Town of Belville to host the fourth annual Brunswick Heritage Riverside Ride

View Full Quarterly Update View November Newsletter

Highly Valued and Protected Natural and Cultural Resources:

  • Initially zoned approximately 7.08 acres into the Conservation Zoning District.

  • The Town provided a letter of support for the WMPO's grant application for NCDOT's Paved Trails Feasibility Grant. The project pertains to the feasibility of constructing a 10'-12' multi-use path facility in the Gullah Geechee Heritage Corridor from Phoenix Park in Navassa to Brunswick Nature Park in unincorporated Brunswick County.

 

Livable, Diverse, and Connected Neighborhoods that Accommodate Growth:

  • Initially zoned approximately 13.26 acres into the Multi-Family Zoning District, which will be able to accommodate residential uses that can support the Town's influx of new residents.

 

A Resilient and Stable Economy:

  • From May to July, the Town annexed approximately 78.48 acres into the municipality for conservation, commercial, and residential land uses.

 

An Inclusive, Supported, Healthy, Safe, and Educated Community:

  • The Town was awarded $10,000 from FOCUS Broadband's Connect Grant program, which will be used on the upcoming Founders Park renovations.

  • Leland Fire/Rescue conducted live fire training on June 28 using a donated house. Multiple fire departments participated in this training.

  • Emergency Management held the Town's annual Hurricane Expo on June 10.

 

Infrastructure that Supports Community Life: 

  • The Town applied to the NC Department of Environmental Quality for a Brownfields Assessment for the Future Sturgeon Creek Park.

 

An Active Participant in a Cooperative Region:

  • Police entered into an agreement with the State Bureau of Investigations to acquire criminal investigation training and equipment.

  • Police and Fire participated in a full-scale active shooter drill at Town Creek Middle School on June 15 with other law enforcement and fire agencies.

  • Fire is assisting the Brunswick County Fire Chiefs Association with conducting a Youth Fire Academy for high school students.

 

View the Full Quarterly Update View the August Newsletter

Highly Valued and Protected Natural and Cultural Resources:

  • Zoned approximately 83 acres into the Conservation District.

  • Amended the Flood Damage Prevention Ordinance to increase the freeboard of non-residential buildings located in a special flood hazard area.

 

Livable, Diverse, and Connected Neighborhoods that Accommodate Growth:

  • Opened the Olde Waterford Way Extension connecting the existing roundabout at Olde Regent Way to Palm Ridge Drive.

  • Opened a 2,900 foot, 12-hole disc golf course adjacent between Village Road and Sturgeon Creek.

 

A Resilient and Stable Economy:

  • Adopted the Town's first Economic Development Strategic Plan.

  • Annexed and established commercial zoning of approximately six acres.

 

An Inclusive, Supported, Healthy, Safe, and Educated Community:

  • Received six awards from the North Carolina Department of Labor (NCDOL) Safety Awards Program.

  • Emergency Management hosted a course on responding to active shooter incidents attended by over 100 emergency responders from across North Carolina.

 

Infrastructure that Supports Community Life: 

  • Awarded $750,000 towards the engineering and design of the Gateway District Utility Resiliency project.

  • Awarded $80,000 through the Safe Streets and Roads for All grant program to develop the Town's first Comprehensive Safety Action Plan.

 

An Active Participant in a Cooperative Region:

  • The Fire Department has organized classes for all Brunswick County 911 Dispatchers to familiarize them with Leland and county-wide fire operations.

  • Police has renewed a Memorandum of Understanding with the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation to assist each other with the investigation of Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC).

 

View the Full Quarterly Update View the May Newsletter

Highly Valued and Protected Natural and Cultural Resources:

  • Zoned approximately 777 acres into the Conservation District.

  • The removal of vegetative debris has commenced on approximately 8,657 linear feet of streambank and encompass areas of Jackeys, Mill, and Sturgeon Creeks.

 

Livable, Diverse, and Connected Neighborhoods that Accommodate Growth:

  • Zoned approximately 68 acres into FlexCode zoning.

  • Unveiled a new 18-panel StoryWalk at Westgate Nature Park designed to encourage movement, reading, and creativity.

 

A Resilient and Stable Economy:

  • Adopted a Public Art Policy which enhances public spaces by way of the inclusion of public art.

  • Annexed approximately 2,142 acres into the Town.

 

An Inclusive, Supported, Healthy, Safe, and Educated Community:

  • Hosted a 2-day Incident Management Team course for Town staff who will assist with managing any large man-made or natural disaster or emergency.

  • Leland Fire/Rescue’s Community Risk Reduction Education Division conducted fire prevention and safety education at two local elementary schools which reached 1,420 children and 109 adults.

 

Infrastructure that Supports Community Life: 

  • Completed the extension of Olde Waterford Way from Palm Ridge Drive to Olde Regent Way.

  • Finalize, the design of the drainage plan improvements of Mallory Creek Drive as a part of the North Carolina Resilient Coastal Communities Program.

 

An Active Participant in a Cooperative Region:

  • Approved a resolution supporting the WMPO's application to the Integrated Mobility Division Feasibility Study Grant Program to complete a feasibility study for a multi-use path along the Gullah Geechee Heritage Corridor.

 

View the Full Quarterly Update View the February Newsletter

Highly Valued and Protected Natural and Cultural Resources:

  • Completed a Tree Canopy Cover Assessment with the NC Forest Service, PlanIt Geo, and NC Urban Forest Council.

  • Awarded a Partners of Green Growth grant through NC Wildlife to complete a Green Network Plan Framework.

 

Livable, Diverse, and Connected Neighborhoods that Accommodate Growth:

  • Adopted the Americans with Disability Act Transition Plan which outlines a plan to become a more accessible community.

  • Annexed approximately 1,250 acres into the Town of Leland for conservation, residential, and commercial land uses.

 

A Resilient and Stable Economy:

  • Executed an agreement with Creative Economic Development Consulting, LLC to prepare an economic development strategic plan and incentive policy.

 

An Inclusive, Supported, Healthy, Safe, and Educated Community:

  • Research proposed, in partnership with NC State University, was selected by NC SeaGrant for "Smart Zoning for Coastal Flood Adaptation and Resilience."

  • Joined the American Flood Coalition which is a nonpartisan coalition advocating for national solutions to flooding and sea level rise.

 

Infrastructure that Supports Community Life: 

  • Appropriated $4.6 million to the Brunswick Village Boulevard Extension Project.

  • Awarded $666,623 by the Wilmington Urban Area Metropolitan Planning Organization for a portion of the estimated cost to design and construct a signalized pedestrian crossing on US Highway 17 at/near the intersection of Ploof Road and Old Waterford Way.

 

An Active Participant in a Cooperative Region:

  • Executed a mutual aid agreement between the Town of Leland and Carolina Beach Police Departments.

  • Executed an amendment to the memorandum of understanding between the Town of Leland Police Department and the Southeastern North Carolina Airborne Law Enforcement Unit to allow for access to drone resources.

 

View the Full Quarterly Update View the November Newsletter

Highly Valued and Protected Natural and Cultural Resources​: 

  • 335 pounds of trash and recycling collected during Community Stream Cleanup​.

  • Received $20,000 in Resilient Coastal Communities Program funding for engineering/design for a drainage plan​.

  • Received $258,429 from the N.C. Department of Agriculture's Streamflow Rehabilitation Assistance Program to conduct vegetative debris removal in Leland streams​.

  • Staff formed an internal Sustainability and Resiliency Committee.

 

Livable, Diverse, and Connected Neighborhoods that Accommodate Growth​:

  • Partnering with N.C. Forestry Service and N.C. Urban Forest Council to create a Tree Canopy Assessment.

 

A Resilient and Stable Economy​:

  • Annexed approximately 190 acres into the Town, roughly 59 of which were zoned commercial​.

  • The Interactive Gateway District Mapping Tool went live on the Town's website to guide redevelopment in the Gateway District.

 

An Inclusive, Supported, Healthy, Safe, and Educated Community​:

  • Partnering with Cape Fear River Watch to conduct research about how much litter enters our stormwater system​.

  • Launched the redesigned Town of Leland website to enhance user-friendliness and accessibility​.

  • Fire Station 53 opened and is operational​.

  • Fire Station 51 is under construction.

 

Infrastructure that Supports Community Life​:

  • Received $950,000 in funding from the Transportation Infrastructure Resiliency Fund for the Leland Resilient Routes Project.

  • Awarded a dual-port electric vehicle charging station for Founders Park through Volkswagen Public Access Program.

 

An Active Participant in a Cooperative Region:​

  • Entered into a Fire Automatic Aid Agreement with Winnabow Volunteer Fire Department​.

  • Partnered with Cape Fear River Watch to place 20 "Do Not Dump-Drains to Creek" markers on stormwater drains​.

  • Attended luncheon about planning in the region​.

  • Participating in regional Community Health Needs Assessment.

 

View the Full Quarterly Update View the August Newsletter

Highly Valued and Protected Natural and Cultural Resources​: 

  • 120 acres of land annexed for conservation​.

  • 1,380 pounds of trash and recycling cleaned during Employee Stream Cleanup​.

  • Two miles of waterways cleaned through USDA Emergency Watershed Protection Project​.

  • Open Space language to deed special environmental features within subdivisions as open space.

 

Livable, Diverse, and Connected Neighborhoods that Accommodate Growth​:

  • ADA Transition Plan to convert all Town facilities to be ADA compliant​.

  • Sweetbay Park acquired to establish a new 18-hole disc golf course​.

  • Founders Park awarded grant for upgrades for a Veterans memorial, splash pad, amphitheater, restrooms, and playground renovations.

  • Pedestrian improvements including sidewalks along Town Hall Drive, Old Fayetteville Road, and Village Road and a multi-use path extension.

 

A Resilient and Stable Economy​:

  • Public Safety department working to obtain the Storm Ready Community designation.

  • Leland Cultural Arts Center scholarship program​.

  • Economic Development Committee completed an update of the 2019 Economic Development Strategic Plan​.

  • Interactive mapping tool to guide redevelopment, economic growth, and public investment.

 

An Inclusive, Supported, Healthy, Safe, and Educated Community​:

  • Substantially completed the construction of Fire Station 53, staffing, and apparatus upgrades​.

  • Police Department completed the NCLM risk assessment affording the Town a reduction in insurance premium​.

  • Joined AARP Network of Age-Friendly Communities to address multigenerational needs.​

  • Enviroscape presentations by Cape Fear River Watch at Leland Middle School to teach watershed management.​

 

Infrastructure that Supports Community Life​:

  • Old Fayetteville Road Multi-Use Path won an NCDOT Mobi Award.

  • Newly adopted open space regulations require major subdivisions to commit required riparian buffers, wetlands under federal or state jurisdiction, or special flood hazard areas towards passive open space requirements.

 

An Active Participant in a Cooperative Region:​

  • Leland Police and Fire/Rescue joined the Cape Fear Regional Special Operations Team to contribute to the safety and security of the region.​

  • Cape Fear River Watch LittaTraps Grant to collect data on pollutants entering the stormwater system​.

  • Off Duty Management to manage off-duty Police Officer employment​.

  • Participating in Cape Fear RISE to develop a portfolio of priority resilience projects that reduce risk.​

 

View the Full Quarterly Update